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Talking Tots speech and language development checklist for children.

Red Flags

To complete the speech and language checklist print this page and check off the features your child demonstrates consistently in everyday speech at or below his/her age level. Any items missed may indicate a potential delay.

Potential areas of concern are: Fluency, Voice, Play Skills, Social Skills, and Hearing

Fluency:

There may be a concern about your child's speech fluency if your child demonstrates:
  • hesitations or pauses which break up the natural rhythm of speech
  • repetitions of sounds, syllables, words, or phrases
  • prolongations of sounds or words

Voice:

There may be a concern about your child's voice if your child demonstrates:
  • excessively high or low voice pitch
  • excessively high or low voice volume, which may cause hoarseness or breathiness
  • excessive nasal resonance

Play Skills:

There may be a concern about your child's play skills if your child does not demonstrate the following skills at appropriate ages:
  • 6 months - brings hands or toys to mouth
  • 9 months - bangs objects together
  • 12 months - takes things out of containers
  • 15 months - stacks 2 blocks
  • 18 months - pushes and pulls toys or objects while walking
  • 2 years - enjoys watching and playing near other children, copies your actions (e.g.: clapping hands)
  • 30 months - acts out daily routines with toys
  • 3 years - plays alongside others comfortably
  • 3 years - plays make-believe games with actions and words
  • 4 years - takes turns and shares with other children in small groups
  • 5 years - plays make-believe games with others
  • 5 years - shares willingly with others
  • 6 years - plays cooperatively with 2 to 3 other children for 20 minutes

Social Skills:

There may be a concern about your child's social skills if your child does not demonstrate the following skills at appropriate ages:
  • 4 months - laughs and smiles at you, brightens to sound, especially voices
  • 6 months - smiles and babbles in response to adult attention
  • 9 months - imitates facial expressions, has a special smile for familiar adults, fusses or cries if a familiar adult looks or acts differently
  • 12 months - takes turns making sounds with you, shows emotions e.g.: anger, affection, joy, and fear, starts games with you e.g.: peek-a-boo, clapping
  • 15 months - repeats an action that makes you laugh, looks at you to see how you react e.g.: after falling, or when a stranger enters the room
  • 18 months - shows affection towards people, pets, or toys, points to show you something, looks at you when talking or playing together
  • 2 years - says "no" and likes to do things without help
  • 30 months - waits briefly for needs to be met e.g.: when placed in a highchair, recognizes self in the mirror
  • 3 years - shares, some of the time, shows affection using words and actions, greets friends and familiar adults when reminded
  • 4 years - takes turns and shares with other children in small groups,tries to comfort someone who is upset, looks for adult approval
  • 5 years - separates easily from you, responds verbally to "hi" and "how are you?", shares willingly with others
  • 6 years - apologizes for actions he/she didn't mean to do, listens while others are speaking, shows an understanding of right/wrong, helps others, explains rules of a game to others

Hearing:


Have your child's hearing checked as early as possible to ensure that hearing loss in not affecting your child's communication development.

* Some items in the Red Flags section of this page have been borrowed from the Nipissing District Developmental Screen, Revised January 2000